Tag Archives: remote control

MobileVNC Embedded VNC Server Library Version 2.1

MobileVNC embedded VNC server library version 2.1 now also supports outgoing connections to VNC repeater software. Find here a detailed tutorial how to connect with VNC behind a Firewall or a NAT router. This lightweight, embedded VNC server is perfectly designed to be integrated within your own hardware or software products.

Windows CE, Windows and Windows Embedded Compact VNC Server Library

MobileVNC Release 2.1: VNC Server for Windows CE and Windows Embedded Compact

VNC Server for WindowsToday, the new release 2.1 of MobileVNC VNC Server for Win32, Windows CE and Windows Embedded Compact was published. It features some major bugfixes and an additional licensing option for the base VNC server library (vnc.lib and vncserverlib.h) integration for your own products. MobileVNC, as a native VNC implementation, offers a tiny footprint VNC integration without any dependencies. MobileVNC is running fast even on the tiniest Windows CE platform and it is backwards compatible until Windows CE 4.2. MobileVNC offers binaries for x86, ARM and MIPS CPU platforms.

Arduino Controlled Magic Chess Board

This Arduino controlled Chess board set tangibly connects two players with each other from anywhere in the world. To combine physical interfaces to intuitively control virtual environments gives users the possibility to control all kinds of digital technology without much background knowledge. The combination of tangible artefacts with digital content is called ‘Tangible User Interfaces’. This amazing chess board game is a perfect example for such a tangible interface approach.

Remote Controlling embedded Windows CE with RealVNC Android VNC Viewer

Today i purchased the RealVNC VNC Viewer for Android based devices, in order to test the compatibility with my MobileVNC Windows CE based VNC server. RealVNC takes €7.55 for this piece of software, which is quite high compared to the typical prices within the Google Play marketplace. Despite my initial fears, the RealVNC VNC Viewer successfully connected to my Windows CE 4.1 embedded thin client device without any complains and i was able to remote control my embedded device by using the touchscreen of my Samsung Nexus Android smartphone. The movement of the remote mouse pointer is shown by a small pixel on the smartphone, according to the fact that every touch is converted to a relative mouse movement, which works really good. See some screenshot of my experiment with RealVNC Android Viewer App in combination with our MobileVNC server and a HP t5000 Windows CE 4.1 thin client.

MobileVNC 2.0 Released with Win32 Support

network, vnc server, remote control, remote maintenance, PocketPC, Windows CE, Win CE, WinCE.NET, Windows CE.NET, WindowsMobile, PocketVNC, AutoPC, Windows Embedded Compact, Embedded Compact 7, Windows Embedded Compact 7, Smartphone, Windows, pos, point-of-sale, terminal, cashier, thin client, cash register, 3700 POS, 9700 HMS, Dell Wyse S30, Dell Wyse Winterm, HMI Panel PC Ex, HP t5000, IPC277D, IPC577C, IPC677C, MICROS e7, MICROS Kiosk, Mobile MICROS, Motorola Symbol MC3190-G, NI PPC-2015, NI PPC-2115, NI TPC-2012, NI TPC-2106, NI TPC-2106T, NI TPC-2512, NI TPC-2512D, NI TPC-2515, NI TPC-2515D, Panel PC 477B, Panel PC 577B, Panel PC 677B, SIMATIC 477CToday, the new version 2.0 MobileVNC was released! MobileVNC now comes with full Win32 support and  Websocket HTML5 client included (noVNC). MobileVNC implements a tiny, copy to install, VNC server that offers remote control for your Windows CE and Win32 based devices. The range of supported devices ranges from mobile barcode scanners, Point-Of-Sales terminals, industrial terminals and smartphones. The MobileVNC server offers tiny footprint and low prices (9.95€ for full commercial license/device). MobileVNC represents an easy solution for remote control and maintenance of a large number of distributed Point-Of-Sales (POS) or logistics terminals.

iPhone controlled bug and beatle

iPhone Controlled BugThis little artificial bug is one of two different models that was published recently by i-Robot. These toys try to simulate the movement of real bugs and beatles. The two creatures come along in combination with an iPhone app that enables the remote control by using your own smartphone. The battery lasts for around 20min operation times. Look at the video below to see these creature in action:

NASA’s Curiosity Rover tests Robotic Arm on Mars

The following image from NASA’s Curiosity rover was taken by the left mast camera (Mastcam).  It shows an image of the camera on the rover’s robotic arm, the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), during the 30th Martian day, or sol, of the rover’s mission on Mars. MAHLI is one of the various tools that sit on the end of Curiosities robotic arm and is used to explore the near surrounding on Mars. After several days traveling and driving on Mars NASA’s rover Curiosity starts to test these tools on it’s robotic arm. NASA is spending several days preparing for full use of the tools on its arm.

“We will be putting the arm through a range of motions and placing it at important ‘teach points’ that were established during Earth testing, such as the positions for putting sample material into the inlet ports for analytical instruments,” said Daniel Limonadi of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., lead systems engineer for Curiosity’s surface sampling and science system. “These activities are important to get a better understanding for how the arm functions after the long cruise to Mars and in the different temperature and gravity of Mars, compared to earlier testing on Earth.”

Camera on Curiosity's Arm as Seen by Camera on Mast

The image below shows the exact location of the arm on NASA’s Curiosity rover, in addition to the arm’s turret, which holds two instruments and three tools. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech:

Curiosity's Robotic Arm

Skippy: Remotely skip stones in Sun Valley, Idaho

Skippy, the stone skipping robot from Sun Valley, Idaho allows stressed people from the city to skip stones on an idyllic lakeside. But wait until daylight because Skippy is afraid of the dark and does not operate in the night 🙂
A really cute idea, professionally implemented with a lot of sponsors out of Sun Valley tourism domain but definitely worth a try!

Physical Computing with your Android Phone


One of the most interesting aspects for every maker is to remote control physical things by using a wireless connection. If you plan to communicate with a microcontroller over large distances and without a WLAN base station, you have to consider to use a GSM/UMTS modem or a smartphone instead. As GSM communication prices became quite low in the last years, using a smartphone for remote communicating with your microcontroller or with your mobile bot seems a pretty good choice. Unfortunately it is quite hard or even impossible to simply connect a smartphone with a typical microcontroller, such as a ATMega or an Arduino.

With the new Sparkfun IOIO board (pronounced “yo-yo”) communication with your Android smartphone gets really easy. You just have to connect the IOIO board with your smartphone over USB or Bluetooth and the board is completely controllable out of your custom Android App. So you are free to implement applications such as remote controlled bots or a remote intruder detection system. No embedded programming or external programmer is needed to program the IOIO board. The IOIO board contains a single microcontroller that acts as a USB host and interprets commands from an Android app. In addition, the IOIO can interact with peripheral devices in the same way as most microcontroller. Digital Input/Output, PWM, Analog Input, I2C, SPI, and UART control can all be used with the IOIO. This is really an amazing little board that opens the implementation of completely new and autonomous physical computing applications!

Just another Quadcopter?


source geek.com

Geek.com published another example for a home made Quadcopter design, which by the way looks quite promising according to its agility and flying characteristics. This quadcopter was designed by AliShanMao and published on his website Only Flying Machines. It is able to carry a payload of around 2.3 kg without any major drawbacks in its flight characteristics.  Only Flying Machines also published some other quadcopter designs and does ship full quadcopter kits for around 500$ each.

http://www.geek.com/articles/geek-cetera/widow-maker-a-super-agile-diy-quadcopter-20120529/