Tag Archives: makezine

Submit your Arduino Projects to the Maker Fair in ROME


Maker Faire Rome - The European Edition
Save the date for the European Maker Faire that takes place from 3 to 6 October in ROME, Italy!

Massimo Banzi, one of the inventors of Arduino, is promoting and hosting this cool Make Event in October. It will be the perfect event for meeting the community of DIY activists and Makers all over Europe. The deadline for submitting your own Make projects and creations has been postopened until end of June. Submit your own Arduino projects here.
Maker Faire showcases the amazing work of all kinds and ages of makers—anyone who is embracing the do-it-yourself (or do-it-together) spirit and wants to share their accomplishments with an appreciative audience.
Topics for the Maker Call are: 3D Printing, Robot, Education, Design, Fashion, Arduino, Crafts, Science, Digital Fabrication, Green, Transportation, Interaction and Young Makers (under 16);

Szymon Klimek’s Miniature Mechanical Creations

By Craig Couden

Photo by Szymon Klimek

Without an everyday reference for a sense of scale, Szymon Klimek’s intricate mechanical creations could easily be mistaken for twice their true size. Made from 0.1 millimeter sheets of brass and bronze, Klimek’s miniature machines dance effortlessly in wine-glass enclosures that measure little more than 4 inches across.

Klimek’s latest creation, Sponge, is a steam engine-like machine named for the latticework of tiny, interconnected brass pieces that expands and contracts as the engine runs. Sitting in a wine glass about a foot tall, a small silicon solar cell powers a concealed electric motor, which drives the 3-inch flywheel. He doesn’t work to a specific scale, but customizes his designs for each glass: the opening of Sponge’s wine glass and the diameter of its flywheel differed by less than a millimeter. CAD programs assist with design, and Klimek, 57, assembles most of the machinery outside of the enclosures, cutting and shaping the pieces by hand. He says the wine glasses lend a bit of elegance to the display, and the spherical shape allows viewers to see the work from any angle. Sealing the top and gluing the machines down with clear resin also protects the delicate pieces from dust and curious fingers.

Living in Poznan, Poland, Klimek entered into the world of small-scale making in 2004 with a miniature steam locomotive and coal wagon, measuring about 3 inches. He’s built close to a hundred handcrafted brass and bronze miniatures, including ornate carriages, early 20th-century roadsters, and yes, even a ship with billowing sails that fits in a wine glass. Since 2008 he’s created nine “active devices.”

Next, Klimek wants to tackle a more challenging material: steel.

Above is an excerpt from MAKE Volume 30.

 

From the pages of MAKE Volume 30:

MAKE Volume 30Until recently, home automation was gimmicky, finicky, and user-hostile. But today, thanks to a new crop of devices and technology standards, home automation is useful, fun, and maker-friendly. In the special section of MAKE Volume 30, we’ll show you: how to flip any switch in your home with a smartphone, home automation without programming, controlling your HVAC with an Arduino, a webcam security system, and a wall-mounted Notification Alert Generator (NAG) that plays timely reminders as you walk by. Plus, you’ll build a Yakitori Grill, a robust R/C flying-wing airplane, sturdy furnishings from PVC, and more!

BUY OR SUBSCRIBE!

Make Volume 30: Smarter Homes

MAKE Volume 30Until recently, home automation was gimmicky, finicky, and user-hostile. But today, thanks to a new crop of devices and technology standards, home automation is useful, fun, and maker-friendly. In the special section of MAKE Volume 30, we’ll show you: how to flip any switch in your home with a smartphone, home automation without programming, controlling your HVAC with an Arduino, a webcam security system, and a wall-mounted Notification Alert Generator (NAG) that plays timely reminders as you walk by. Plus, you’ll build a Yakitori Grill, a robust R/C flying-wing airplane, sturdy furnishings from PVC, and more!

How-To: Old-School Red-Blue 3D Photos and Videos on the Cheap

3D-Photo-and-Video-Rig

Good old red-blue anaglyphic 3D works on ordinary screens, can be printed using any color printer, and requires only super-cheap glasses for viewing. Steve White wanted to see how cheaply he could build a digital camera rig for creating red-blue 3D stills and video. His goals included real-time preview ability, focus and parallax control, and most importantly, compatibility with his daughter’s Barbie and the Magic of Pegasus 3D glasses. What he came up with is the Frankencam3D, which is basically two Logitech QuickCam Deluxe webcams that he bought refurbished for $15 each mounted on brackets on a mini tripod. For software, to make videos Steve uses Stereoscopic Multiplexer and Stereoscopic Player software (free trial version available). To shoot stills, he recommends the free Onuprova 3D Camera.

Steve shared his build instructions with us in the new upcoming MAKE School’s Out special issue, which features many 3D shots (including the cover) and comes with 3D glasses. The issue is jam-packed with fun summer projects for kids (big and small), and officially hits newsstands next week, on May 29. His how-to is also available for you now on Make: Projects.

3D-Photo-and-Video-Sample

From the pages of MAKE’s School’s Out special issue:

MAKE's School's Out special issue

MAKE’s School’s Out! special issue gives kids an endless summer’s worth of inspiring do-it-yourself projects. Jam-packed with original (and thrilling!) activities photographed in 3D, you’ll enjoy it all year long. Featuring our first 3D magazine cover and your own pair of 3D glasses in every issue, this special issue brings you tips, tools, and toys for young makers, and 50+ projects to make, including electronics, music, 3D printing, toys, snacks, weird science, outdoors, robots, and much more.

  • Build a zipline and zoom through the trees
  • Make your own guitars, amplifiers, and silk-screened T-shirts for a backyard rock concert
  • Launch rockets from a compressed air launcher
  • Rig two webcams to create your own 3D movies
  • Do battle with easy-to-make Marshmallow Shooters
  • Build electronic pranks and spy gadgets to torment your frenemies
  • Visit a hackerspace and 3D-print your head!
  • Meet young makers like DIY video star Super Awesome Sylvia (on the cover) and Joey Hudy (Extreme Marshmallow Cannon) and Ben Hylak (MAYA Telepresence Robot), whose winning projects took them all the way to the White House Science Fair

On newsstands May 29! Get it at the Maker Shed, or at a RadioShack or newsstand near you!

Build a Fun Solar Roller or Symet BEAM Bot This Weekend

Makezine latest Weekend Project will have you exploring the field of BEAM robotics, which… wait, did that Symet just move on its own accord? Yes, these BEAM Solar Chariots have a mind of their own! Well not really a mind, more like a nervous system that stores up solar power and then discharges it, producing movement. Inspired by nature, BEAM stands for Biology, Electronics, Aesthetics, and Mechanics, which both informs and inspires BEAM design and function. The Solar Roller and Symet both use the same circuit design, dubbed “solar engine,” named so for deriving its energy from solar light. With various technoscrap parts — we salvaged ours from an old micro-cassette player – and common components (transistors, resistors, LED, and capacitors) hooked up to a solar cell, you can build one of these little critters!

The Solar Roller move forward with bursts of energy, while the Symet spins around on its DC motor’s axle. Watch the video below to see both these vehicle being built and in action, then head over to the project page to start making your own BEAM critters!

See all of the Weekend Projects posts