Tag Archives: context-sensitive

Twine: The Internet of Things for your own Use

Twine - eine kleine Box mit Sensoren und WLAN zum Einbinden von beliebigen Dingen ins Internet (Bild: Supermechanical)

Twine, one of the first Kickstarter projects dealing with specific hardware to connect sensors and aktuators with the Internet, is starting to ship the first bundles these days. For around $100 you can buy a Twine box, that is shown above, that offers WLAN and a multitude of different sensors to check the status of your house or any other real world object you can think of. It runs on two batteries that should offer enough energy to keep Twine up for more than two month.

Another interesting feature is the Web interface Twine offers for specifying event condition action rules for reacting on user defined situations, without programming. The Web interface and ECA rules look quite similar to Microsoft’s On{X} Android App, which we discussed some month ago.

Microsoft publishes on{X} Android App

A little surprise was Microsoft’s publication of a new Android App on{X} (yes its no typo, Microsoft published an Android exclusive App) App for automating context-sensitive tasks with the use of simple user defined scripts (called recipes). on{X} (pronounced like ‘on-ex’) lets you control and extend the capabilities of your Android phone using a JavaScript API to remotely program it. These recipes are much the same approach i published within my PhD thesis, except the fact that in my work they were called rules (ECA = Event Condition Action Rules). Its good to see that finally this idea of letting users customize their smart devices to react context-aware on user defined situations, got general acceptance by big players like Microsoft.

In order to push user defined rules to your Android phone you just have to install the on{X} application on your Android phone, log in to the website and app, and push rules to your phone. Rules you create using the on{X} website are immediately sent to your phone using the on{X} application. The rules you create run on your phone, using the phone’s abilities such as GPS, text messages, phone calls, and more. The phone’s abilities are exposed in the on{X} API as Triggers and Actions (as i already mentioned before within the global community this concept was published as Event, Condition Action rules).

on{X} can be used to set specific triggers based on the phone’s sensors and abilities, which typically define the context in which the user and his/her phone are in the moment. A wide variety of triggers are described in our documentation. Some basic triggers are location, weather, time, news, battery and wifi (what about activity, acceleration, movement, sound, light, direction, photo, companions and friends, …?)

Finally, i have to admit that on{X} is a nice tool for every user of a smartphone and that Microsoft published a work that very much goes along with my own implementations in my PhD work (which was published in 2004).

If you would like to try on{X} for yourself, scan the QR code and go on testing…

download the app

scan the QR code or enter
http://aka.ms/onxapp on your Android phone.

source: www.onx.ms