Category Archives: Uncategorized

Augmented Assistance for Bycicle Riders

Within this amazing video an inventor presents a system, consisting of a Raspberry PI, a hall sensor, GPS and a small projector, that is able to project the actual driving speed in front of a bycicle rider. So whereever you are driving you always see actual driving stats in front of you without any major distraction. A real cool idea!

Android-based Homecockpit app

The purpose of the Homecockpit app is to give you an overview on the actual situation in and around your house. Homecockpit should show useful information, such as multiple camera live streams, current weather condition, weather forecast, time and date in a cockpit like manner.

Future Dash EnergyBuddy

The core of EnergyBuddy is a low-cost and easy to install stylish gateway that connects to the home network. It operates with or without a smart meter and brings home energy consumption to life with vivid dashboards on PCs and mobile apps

image source: FutureDash.com

The Cali-based startup FutureDash presents The EnergyBuddy, which was first unveiled as a prototype at CES and now going toward the final release date. FutureDash is a complete home energy-tracking system, which uses sensors in your electricity grid in order to monitor your houshold energy consumption. Starting at $99, it keeps tabs on users’ energy consumption with a square-shaped gadget that connects to your network via WiFi or Ethernet. The square glows red, yellow or green depending on how much electricity you’re using, and the user is able to specify the typical footprint profiles.

Their motto is: ‘Increased energy awareness leads to increased energy conservation.’

Peter Norvig: The 100,000 Student Classroom

Last fall of 2011 Peter Norvig, a leading American computer scientist and Artificial Intelligence expert startet a virtual class along with his college Sebastian Thrun on artificial intelligence. the class was visited by 175 students from Stanford and more than 100,000 via an interactive webcast. Peter Norvig is talking about the fact that we are teaching knowledge in classes with the same methods today as we did hundreds years ago. So he argues that today we have the possibility to change the way we are teaching and that we could produce a lot more positive educational effects with our modern infrastructures. Watch his really interesting TED talk about his experiences with this 100K classroom.

Apple ][+ Teardown


Todd Harrison of Mesa, AZ, wrote in with his teardown and restoration of a ’80s-era Apple.

The very first computer I ever used was an Apple II Plus in high school and I couldn’t get enough time on this machine. I was more than fascinated by computers I was obsessed. Every minute learning on the Apple was a joy to me but later my parents got me a Commodore 64 home computer which consumed me for years. I still took every computer class I could in high school where all the assignments were on the Apple II Plus and I think we had Apple IIe computers by my senior year.

Math Monday: Hula Hoop Geometry, Part 1

By Glen Whitney for the Museum of Mathematics

Math_Monday_banner02_600px.jpg

Math Mondays have so far featured a wide array of different items from which one can make a tremendous variety of geometric constructions, but there has not yet been one on hula hoops. This week and next we’ll remedy that oversight. Also, the postings so far have almost entirely shown the constructions as fait accompli, so this series will also try to give a bit of insight into the process of devising a new creation.


Total structural collapse, leading to hula chaos! What to do?

To be continued…

More:
See all of our Math Monday columns

 

Aquabotix: Remote controlled underwater eye

Aquabotix,

This compact remote controlled underwater vehicle can record live video and capture photos in HD, streaming them to your iPad and allowing you to share with family and friends. The vehicle’s features includes LED lights, HD camera, Standard 75 foot cable, Waterproof carrying case, Topside box which produces vehicles Wi-Fi. This underwater bot is perfect for studying marine life, checking water depths or inspecting under your boat. Stay dry and safe from topside while recording videos and snapping photos to upload and share on social media sites.

The HydroView remotely controlled underwater vehicle lets you check on an anchor, look for something that fell overboard or off a dock and study marine life

MoleBot: Mole in a Table

MoleBot is a mole robot built under a transformable board table that allows people to interact with everyday objects and props, and experience what it feels like to have a mole live under your table. MoleBot gives us the feeling as if the interactive interface blends the virtual and the physical reality.

It was exhibited at SIGGRAPH 2011 Emerging Technologies from August 7 to 11 in Vancouver, Canada. The MoleBot project was invited at Laval Virtual 2012 and won the Laval Virtual Awards grand prix on March 29, 2012.


The Pipe Crawler

images taken from: http://eikimartinson.com/engineering/pipe/

Eiki Martinson published a really cool senior university project, where he and his team implemented a Pipe Crawler robot. Pipe inspection definitely is one of those specialized killer apps of robotics, like exploring space, recently search and rescue within radioactive facilities or mowing the lawn, that have spawned a remarkable number of experimental attempts, working machines for industry, and even (in the case of mowing the lawn) consumer products. Examples of pipe-crawling robots pop up every couple of months in the popular scientific magazines. To distinguish their approch from other already existing efforts, they decided that the machine should be able to travel through horizontal segments, around corners, and straight up. This last requirement rules out a simple rover or wheeled cart. To maintain itself in a vertical section, the robot has to press wheels against the sides of the pipe by mechanical means (ruling out serpentine or inchworm mechanisms—but these also have to press something at least against the walls). They selected a radial arrangement of three sprung wheels. The robot would consist of many such units, articulated like a railroad train, so that it could negotiate corners.

A really nice work, despite the fact that it was finished in 2003. The online documentation of the work is really good and worth reading.